Revisiting Sew Over/Under

In August of 2019 our theme of the month was Sew Over/Under. I was on maternity leave with a brand spanking new babe, so unfortunately I did not get to participate. There were some really amazing interpretations of the theme.

I think this theme is such a fun one because there is so much room for interpretation. In revisiting this theme, I thought it might be nice to provide some resources for under and over patterns. I hope to share some that are (or will become) TNT (“tried and true”), several new fun patterns, and some older patterns that have expanded their size ranges.


Over Patterns

Since our theme month, there have been many wonderful outerwear patterns released. I’m really loving all the work-wear inspired pieces, such as the Sienna Maker Jacket (below, top left) from Closet Case Patterns (who have recently added a curvy fit block with sizes from 14 – 30). The Suki Robe pattern from Helen’s Closet (bottom left) has also recently gotten a size expansion. (Let’s be real, a great deal of us who are #sewcialdistancing could stand to have a few extra lounge wear pieces right now anyways.) The Peppermint Robe Jacket (center) from Peppermint Magazine could go either lounge wear or staple outerwear, depending on the fabric you choose; and it’s free if you are on a tight budget. But if you really want to lean into the lounge I think The Billie Wearable Blanket (at right) from DIYB Club may be the best way to really embrace the comfies.

I consider pants, bibs, and pinafores to be outerwear also—and I LOVE that pull-on pants and wide leg pants are having a moment. I loved my skinny jeans for a long time, but it is time to set my legs free! Last summer I tested the Fernway Culottes (below, left) from Twig & Tale; one of my favorite parts of this pattern is that there is a maternity option! On my list of things to make this year are the Free Range Slacks (center) from Sew House Seven. They have also expanded their size range to have a curvy fit block. The York Pinafore, another Helen’s Closet pattern (at right), has gotten super popular; as a self-proclaimed sloth sewist I actually finished it very quickly when I made mine! For those of us who have more on our plates even though we have fewer places to be, a quick project is nice to have around. This pattern also has quite a few hacks which can be found on Helen’s Closet’s blog.


Under

Underthings are fairly uncharted territory for me. So I asked you wise Sewcialists for help with this part. There were two often-mentioned pattern designers in particular, each of whom have too many amazing designs to share just one. Sophie Hines came up multiple times (below, left). She has some absolutely gorgeous patterns for undies and bralettes. She also sells kits on her site for make-your-own undies. The other name that came up frequently is House of Morrighan. I really love that these patterns are designed for a curvier frame. The Dahlia Bralette (below, right) actually makes me feel like I can sew myself a bra!

Now underthings don’t always mean underwear. Underthings can also include base layers for cold weather, leggings, bike shorts for under skirts and dresses, camisoles, etc. The sky is truly the limit. I stumbled upon the MyFit Leggings from Apostrophe Patterns and was quite intrigued. You plug in your measurements, fabric, and desired fit, and they automatically generate a customized pattern that is meant to fit your body perfectly. I already have several free leggings patterns that fit alright with few alterations, so I have not tried the MyFit pattern myself yet.


I wish I could share every single pattern, and as I’m writing this conclusion, I’m thinking of even more patterns and pattern designers. I hope this post gives you some inspiration to sew more over/under wear!

Have you tried any of these patterns? Do you have any pattern suggestions I did not include? Let me know in the comments!


Amanda is a tired mom of 2 boys sharing everyday normal life over at @mandabe4r. Maybe someday she’ll find time to finish something and post it on the ‘gram.


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